New in this travel and very scared

Pls what’s the significance of having HBeAG negative, and it’s speedily effect on liver disease like HCC, cirrhosis etc

How optimistic are you about achieving WHO objectives by 2030 given the latest drugs in development

Dear @CSKAY,

HBeAg-negative means that your body has mounted an immune response against hepatitis B. If there continues to be inflammation (high ALTs) and virus replication (HBV DNA), then this could signal an increased risk for liver cancer and liver cirrhosis.

I think the WHO objectives can be met with the current treatments we do have. We need to implement a lot of new policies to increase the number of people being vaccinated, diagnosed, in care, and (where needed) treated. While new drugs would help speed things along (particularly a novel cure), achieving the WHO objectives can be done even without them.

Thomas

2 posts were merged into an existing topic: EXPLAINER: Lab results and their interpretation

Hi everybody.
As I mentioned above, I have a prolonged APTT and I did tests and they found an elevated PFA, something about the platelets, has anyone encountered anything similar, the doctor tells me that maybe it is from hepatitis or tenofovir.

Hi @gvit, it’s hard to provide feedback on this without the specific results and your medical history. There can be multiple causes of this. It’s not clear whether it could be from the hepatitis, tenofovir, or anything else that you’re exposed to.

Thomas

Hope you well @john.tavis Would you know the incidence rate of begnine cysts amongst persons with CHBV? And how do they relate with HCC from a probability perspective @availlant too? I appreciate you all.

Hi @CNN,

Benign liver cysts are relatively common in people (whether they have HBV or not). Benign liver lesions in general are very common (1 in 3 - Liver Lesions - Liver Foundation) and usually don’t cause any trouble and aren’t treated.

I am unaware of any link between liver cancer and cysts, but given there are so many people with them, it’s probably unlikely to be causative.

Hope this helps,
Thomas

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Thank you. @ThomasTu . In that article they say it’s normal and not to worry situation but towards the end they say if you have a liver lesion, you’re more at risk of liver cancer if: you have HBV or C, Cirrhosis or hemochromatosis or obesity. What do you make of that? Is this indicative of more risk or it’s not an added layer of risk than we already have? It’s the additional.risk I want to know…and best way to keep track of the cysts. Is ultrasound (US) a good way to proceed? Are CT scans loaded with radiation since I can’t afford doing MRIs every other time. What’s the best frequency to track cysts?

Last, am looking for a lived example of someone who is taking Velmidy and Statins at the same time. Anyone in this forum? Would want to understand the side effects when taking both.

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Hi @CNN,

They are saying that any liver lesion is more likely to be a cancer if you have these other diseases. However, if it is diagnosed as a benign liver lesion, then it doesn’t say anything about whether you have additional risk of liver cacner.

Your doctor will know the best way to track them, but if it was found by ultrasound in the first place then it probably will be continued to be monitored by US.

I think there has been some statins discussion in other sections of the forum:

Hope this helps,
Thomas

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